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Noise Isolation .vs. Cancellation .vs. Reduction – protect your ears and work in peace & quiet

Posted by bcmoney on August 14, 2017 in E-Learning, Multimedia with No Comments


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Most of the time, Developers’ day-to-day jobs can be a bit stressful. With tight deadlines, high expectations, and often unwieldy applications/codebases to manage, you can see how there really is a need to be able to concentrate in order to succeed in this role. Of course, this applies to non-technical roles as well, but in particular you want to maximize the productivity of those building your company’s mission critical applications, products and services. That’s of course assuming whatever industry you’re in, those have already been in some way affected by the pervasiveness of the internet, always-on mobile devices and constantly adapting technology in all its various forms. For instance, the frequent headlines about how modern cars now contain more lines of code than airplanes (not just the passenger/cargo planes, even when compared to military fighter jets).

Noise Isolation

Noise Isolation means that the headphones, earphones or similar device is ergonomically designed to block out as much noise as possible from entering the ear canal through careful selection of optimum construction materials and muffling/insulation layers. It does not do much to block low-level surrounding noise and does not make use of any power or electronics to do “Active” blocking of noise. This “Passive Noise minimization” approach typically does not offer much if any protection to your ears against loud noises, but can definitely help your podcasts, audiobooks, music, radio, E-Learning courses, etc take over from the ambient and background noises in your office or around your home.

Ideal usage: task concentration, or, distraction-free multi-tasking

Noise Cancellation

Also known as Active Noise Control (ANC), or active noise reduction, is a method for reducing unwanted sound by the addition of a second sound specifically designed to cancel the first.

Idea usage: …

Noise Reduction

NRR rating for protecting your ears from sudden loud noises.

Idea usage: …

 

Conclusion

Check out the video below for a nice overview of the difference certain Noise Cancelling technologies make to the sound you hear with and without music:

Audio Recognition overview (TTS, STT, Voice .vs. Speech)

Posted by bcmoney on July 16, 2015 in Multimedia, Semantic Web, Web Services with No Comments


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English: A Yeti brand, USB microphone by Blue ...

Yeti brand of USB microphone by the “Blue Microphones” company. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It is still in many ways the early days of innovation in the several sub-categories of Audio Recognition.

Microphones

Thanks to technological advancements, microphones have become smaller and smaller (perhaps to some extent this has been driven by the post-war and Cold War eras where espionage became so critical, so governments worldwide competed producing better and better audio recording technologies). Either way, a good Microphone is the key technology to ensuring high-quality accuracy & results. While software solutions are increasingly capable of making due with embedded microphones (such as the commodity grade ones that tend to come installed in Mobile Phones, Laptops or other devices), a good external Microphone is essential for high accuracy. Examples of external microphones include wearable headsets or standalone mics connected via Bluetooth, USB cable or Analog/Digital cords. The technology has now improved to the point that the average person can produce audio on par with that of major production studios, all within a reasonable budget.

Speech Recognition

What was said?

Bell Labs pioneered advancements in this area with the creation of the first Text-To-Speech (TTS) technologies, and later Speech-To-Text (STT) during part of their ____ projects in the 19??’s.

 

Voice Recognition

Who said it?

Security companies have started adding Voice Recognition capabilities to their systems since _____ .

 

Agents

Something the Semantic Web promised but had not initially delivered on was an emergence of Intelligent Agents (i.e. code-powered Personal Assistants). Today, we finally see some of this promise being realized through things like Siri by Apple, Cortana by Microsoft, “Now!” by Google and Alexa/Echo by Amazon.

 

Web APIs

Microsoft has offered Windows-specific OS-level Speech API (SAPI) since WindowsXP and developers have been integrating Voice/Speech into their Windows apps for a while now, but now it will soon also offer web-based APIs through the announcement of “Project Oxford”. Project Oxford is aimed at building a set of intelligent services to support information retrieval which can optionally tie into the Bing Search APIs (which supports queries by content type including Web, News, Images, Video, )

 

 

JS Podcatcher (a Podcast client written in JavaScript)

Posted by bcmoney on November 29, 2014 in HTML, JavaScript, Multimedia, TV with No Comments


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English: The "Made for iPod, iPhone, iPad...

English: The “Made for iPod, iPhone, iPad” emblem appearing on accessories approved by Apple Inc. for iPod, iPhone, and iPad. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So just this month my 5-year old iPhone3GS finally bit the dust. I had been hanging on and managed to extend its life well beyond its 3-year Telco contract (which I immediately cancelled the day I was out) by pairing it with a MiFi hotspot for much cheaper VoIP-based calling and using data-intensive applications only when on WiFi. That trusty iPhone3GS made it through a major liquid submersion (thanks to the good folks at Atlantic Cell Phone Repair) two cracked screens (thanks to the good folks at iCracked). At some point I may even replace the screen again, which is what’s gone a third time. I’m pretty stubborn though, and now that I’ve finished off my Mobile contract for the MiFi as well, pretty much at all costs I really didn’t want to have to buy another discounted device which usually requires one to agree to the terms of a foolishly one-sided/restrictive 2-year or 3-year contract; likewise, I really don’t want to shell out anywhere near the full asking price in the $500-$1000 price range for a new smartphone. So it’s either go back to my old Nokia flip-phone and live in the early 2000’s on a basic voice-calling only plan, or, hack my old 4th generation iPod Touch into something with phone call abilities. Of course, I opted for the latter!

iPhone 3G and iPod Classic 5G.

iPhone 3G and iPod Classic 5G. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Luckily thanks to an excellent VoIP app called BRIA (of which a 4th gen. iOS 4 version is still available in the iTunes App Store), I was able to continue doing voice calling by using my Anveo VoIP service (highly recommend this low-cost VoIP provider, please enter Referral Code 5334764 if registering). I was already using Anveo through BRIA on the iPhone, over MiFi when on-the-go, for over a year and a half since I got out of that first contract. I’ve described Anveo in great detail in “My Experiment in Cutting Cords (and costs) with VoIP” where I went over setting the VoIP service up on an iPhone (with BRIA app) and just how much could actually be saved per month by taking the plunge and switching to VoIP instead of a traditional Telco calling/data plan. I’ve found that with a little patience and using replacements (such as Slingplayer in place of Bell MobileTV, or, SoundHound in place of Shazam) along with some occasional disappointment (can’t get older versions of Netflix, Skype, Fitocracy, and several other top apps), I was able to get a good amount (about half) of the apps I was most frequently using on my iPhone3GS, downloaded to the iPod4th gen, in their older iOS 4-supported versions.

One somewhat irreplaceable app though that I just simply could not find, nor find a replacement for was the basic “Podcasts” app built by Apple (common alternatives such as Overcast, Downcast, TuneIN, Slacker, and even RSSradio all did not work on my device either). I mean, seriously Apple, WTF!? Even the very first iPod devices were within a few years of their release to become known as the cannonical “Podcatcher” (Podcatcher means a podcast downloader/player).

The term “podcasting” itself was first mentioned by Ben Hammersley in a February 2004 article in The Guardian newspaper as a portmanteau of the words “pod”, from the success in consumerizing digital music with the “iPod” line of Apple products and “broadcast” (as in traditonal Radio/TV broadcasting to many receivers over a wide area, constantly). As such, the native “Podcasts” app has been around since the early days, as Podcatching (better known as receiving and listening to Podcasts), became one of the main functions of iPods just as it continues to be a core functionality on the many other iOS devices. Why then, are older (iOS < 6) versions of the Podcasts app not still available through the iTunes App Store? The app existed back then, for those devices, and now its just plain unavailable it seems. Why not keep the old versions around? What if a legacy iPod user (anyone still on iOS 4 or lower for that matter) accidentally wipes or restores their device to factory settings? Tough luck if they didn’t store a backup that had that legacy version of the app which still runs on their device. This is an example of planned obsolescence at its worst!!!

Apple be damned, could the Podcast app’s functionality be replaced with a quickly hacked together web app though? Being a developer, that’s the question I wanted an answer to. So I realized it definitely should be doable, as Podcasts to me have always simply been RSS news feeds with links to Audio files embedded in them in a variety of ways. Thanks to Apple’s aforementioned “Podcatching” dominance, and iTunes’ position of oligopoly, Podcasts also need to be garnished with plenty of Apple-specific syntactic metadata to satisfy the behemoth that is the iTunes Store and rank better therein, so have to be able to parse that crap too.

All that to set the context for this experiment, which aims to concisely (I promise hah, from here on) describe how I took my original RSS parser from the post “RSS Reader in jQuery .vs. JavaScript”) on using JavaScript and/or jQuery to implement an RSS news reader, and modified it a few weeks ago to allow me to read the media links and embed codes.

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DIY Project – Home Theatre Projection Screen Controls

Posted by bryan on July 3, 2014 in Multimedia, TV with 2 Comments


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John Underkoffler explains the human-computer ...

John Underkoffler explains the human-computer interface he first designed as part of the advisory work for the film Minority Report. The system, called “g-speak”, is now real and working. Note the gloves Underkoffler is wearing. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Inspired by the now infamous TED Talk presentation by John Underkoffler (scroll to the end of this post if you haven’t seen it yet), one of the leading MIT researchers behind the Futuristic UIs and Technologies that appear in the 2002 Sci-Fi film Minority Report, I’ve set out to find my own “best approximation” of a futuristic yet simplistic controller interface for my Home Theatre.

In considering this home Do-It-Yourself (DIY) project, I wanted to cover the full spectrum of possibilities, from the most simplistic options to the most complex. Another major restriction I put on myself was budget. No single solution should cost more than $100 to implement, and in fact, the cheaper the better! Of course, I should also acknowledge that most of my intended use-cases could have been solved by purchasing a Smart TV (depending on the brand and software version of the unit) however again, due to budget limitations that’s out of my range and I’m assuming also out of the range of the majority of readers here, not to mention it really defeats the purpose of trying to get this all working on a 100+ inch projection screen, which is a screen size that’s definitely out of most people’s price range!

 

The projector I’m using is the Optoma EW1610, which I purchased for about $800 back in late 2009. Its four years old now but it has aged quite well, and the specs were the best I could afford at the time. The point was, I knew that it would come in far more affordable, not to mention handy (and be a heck of a lot lighter during my frequent moves) than a big-screen TV with similar specs.

Its specs are:

  • Display Technology: 0.65” DMD DLP™ Technology (by Texas Instruments)
  • Brightness: 2700 ANSI Lumens
  • Native Aspect Ratio: 16:10 Native (4:3, 5:4 & 16:9 compatible)
  • Contrast Ratio: 2000:1
  • Video Definitions: 720p, 1080i, 1080p/60, 576i, 576p, 480p, 480i
  • Native Resolution: 1280 x 800
  • Image Size Range:  40″-300″
  • Digital Inputs/Outpus: DVI-I (HDCP), S-Video, USB, RS-232, VGA in/out
  • Audio Inputs: Stereo/AUX
  • Built-In Speakers: 2.0 W Mono

There are significantly more powerful projectors available for the same price-range today, or for even less.

The following are the main PROJECTOR CONTROL OPTIONS I evaluated:

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HTML5 Audio Player Jukebox

Posted by bcmoney on May 16, 2014 in AJAX, Flash, HTML, JSON, Multimedia, XML with No Comments


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A jukebox icon

A jukebox icon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Here’s a piece of work I did on a freelance basis back in early 2012 for a client who allowed me to retain the full rights to the code as a “library” which I could distribute. (I offered them two prices of course, one cheaper rate where I retain the rights and one premium rate in which the code was exclusive to them and I would not distribute). After explaining that based on their request, I would be building it as HTML5/CSS3/JS front-end code that lives in the browser client and regardless of which choice they made it would be entirely possible for someone else to simply hit “view source” and/or sniff out raw traffic packets to copy it in full, they of course chose the cheaper option; they knew from all the hype around HTML5 in 2012 that they wanted it done in HTML5 and browser-based without relying on Flash (using Flash as a fallback only). Of course, the ease with which it would be copyable would depend entirely upon how well they protect their site through SSL-certs/code-signing/code-obsfucation/disabling-ViewSource or for example, put it behind a web viewer in a Mobile App or RIA viewer (Flex/Silverlight/JavaFX) and hiding URLs, if they really want it private. But that’s another point altogether!

They chose the cheaper option so I’ve been sitting on the code and until now I had been a combination of “too lazy”, “too busy” and “out-of-respect-for-them” not bothering to release or advertise the existince of said code. However, the time has come to unleash it! For those who’ve been at this for as long as me or longer, you may recognize that it is inspired heavily by some earlier 2009-2010 HTML5 audio demos done by the Mozilla development team as far as the look & feel; but I’ve added quite a few new features to it (for example the Flash-based fallback for old browsers like IE 5-8), CSS for a slick flat direct-link playlist if both HTML5 & Flash are missing, and the main feature which is support for both XSPF and JSPF playlist formats, which are by far the most popular open playlist data formats which really should be supported by all Online Music services (but that’s another story).

Ironically enough (as I blogged about benefits and annoyances of skeumorphs last year) it is more of a skeumorph for my old iPod shuffle which had two simple arrows (left for “previous”, right for “next”) than it is for an actual Jukebox, but I’m still calling it a jukebox where you can pick from multiple albums as long as they are all aggregated to the same XSPF/JSPF Playlist. Either way, I rather like it and think it borderline qualifies as a flat-design, web-based version of a Jukebox. It was also a disproportionately lot of work to put together considering I did the work for quite cheap and it was ultimately only going to be used to play a specific band’s few albums they had at the time online. As mentioned, it can pretty much support up to 1000’s of songs at a time (though I haven’t tested its limits or ran any browser comparison benchmarks or anything fancy-pantsy like that). Either way, it should theoretically fit as many as could fit into a single XML/JSON file without bringing your browser to a griding halt when trying to fetch, load and parse it, which is definitely in the hundreds if not thousands of lines of items.

Here it is, with a modest 4 sample albums (only one song per album for rights purposes) with royalty-free music I downloaded from Jamendo before they went under and/or re-focused their “open music community”.

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BC$ = Behavior, Content, Money

The goal of the BC$ project is to raise awareness and make changes with respect to the three pillars of information freedom - Behavior (pursuit of interests and passions), Content (sharing/exchanging ideas in various formats), Money (fairness and accessibility) - bringing to light the fact that:

1. We regularly hand over our browser histories, search histories and daily online activities to companies that want our money, or, to benefit from our use of their services with lucrative ad deals or sales of personal information.

2. We create and/or consume interesting content on their services, but we aren't adequately rewarded for our creative efforts or loyalty.

3. We pay money to be connected online (and possibly also over mobile), yet we lose both time and money by allowing companies to market to us with unsolicited advertisements, irrelevant product offers and unfairly structured service pricing plans.

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