Behavior, Content, Money – 3 Things you should never give away for free!!!

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Publishing an App to the Cloud – AWS .vs. AppEngine .vs. Azure .vs. Heroku .vs. OpenShift .vs. OpenStack

Posted by bcmoney on May 30, 2018 in Cloud Computing with No Comments


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Public Cloud

Also known as a shared cloud, such Public Cloud services are provided “as-a-service” over the Internet, with little or no control over the underlying technology infrastructure. This cloud setup is appealing to many decision-makers as it reduces complexity (server sprawl within each company/department/location) and also reduces long lead times in testing, deploying and distributing new products. It is generally cheaper than traditional IT infrastructure in terms of moving the costs/risks of equipment ownership to the Public Cloud company, and the commoditization of such infrastructure makes managing the day-to-day operations of applications more efficient as well.

Private Cloud

Also called an “internal cloud” or “enterprise cloud”, the Private Cloud can offer activities and functions “as-a-service” but is deployed within a company intranet or internally hosted & managed datacenter, offsite. This cloud setup is packaged as a private product for a company or organization to implement on their own resources, and offers advanced security and high availability or fault-tolerant solutions not typically possible in a Public Cloud setup. In this scenario, the Private Cloud owner shares few, if any, resources with other organizations. Hence, multi-tenancy is not an issue. Little or no control is usually permitted over the underlying technology infrastructure. This cloud is appealing to many decision-makers as it reduces complexity and long lead times in testing and deploying new products. It is generally cheaper, too.

Open Cloud

Open Cloud Computing services are defined as those which allow full not only read/write access to their paying users but also the ability to download the entire environment, as well as to customize which software and platforms are installed in the environment. In addition, the full source code for the Cloud platform is made available so that more advanced users could potentially run their own instances on their own commodity servers/hardware.

Closed Cloud

Closed Cloud Computing services are defined as those which allow only partial (or possibly full) read/write access to their paying users but differ drastically from Open Clouds in that they do not provide the capability to download the entire environment, and the options for customizzation are limited to preset options for which software and platforms are installed in the environment (in particular, that company’s own technology would likely feature prominently; as in the case of Windows Azure which only runs Microsoft technologies such as C# and ASP.net on a Windows Server and/or IIS, or, Oracle MyCloud which runs only Java-based technologies on Solaris and/or Glassfish). In addition, the source code for the Cloud platform itself is not available thus customers typically do not have the option of running an instance of the cloud platform on their own commodity servers/hardware.

Hybrid Cloud

The Hybrid Cloud is an integrated approach, combining the power of both public and private clouds. Customized rules and policies govern areas such as security and the underlying infrastructure. In this scenario, activities and tasks are allocated to internal or external clouds as required.

 

Summary of Cloud Offerings

  Open Closed Public Private Hybrid Data Cost AWS AppEngine Azure OpenShift OpenStack

BC$ = Behavior, Content, Money

The goal of the BC$ project is to raise awareness and make changes with respect to the three pillars of information freedom - Behavior (pursuit of interests and passions), Content (sharing/exchanging ideas in various formats), Money (fairness and accessibility) - bringing to light the fact that:

1. We regularly hand over our browser histories, search histories and daily online activities to companies that want our money, or, to benefit from our use of their services with lucrative ad deals or sales of personal information.

2. We create and/or consume interesting content on their services, but we aren't adequately rewarded for our creative efforts or loyalty.

3. We pay money to be connected online (and possibly also over mobile), yet we lose both time and money by allowing companies to market to us with unsolicited advertisements, irrelevant product offers and unfairly structured service pricing plans.

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