Behavior, Content, Money – 3 Things you should never give away for free!!!

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Push-Messaging with JMS

Posted by bryan on January 21, 2010 in AJAX, E-Learning, Java, JavaScript, Web Services with 1 Comment


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Hiram Chirino, Logo for Apache ActiveMQ, http:...

Hiram Chirino, Logo for Apache ActiveMQ, http://activemq.apache.org/ Released under the Apache Software License 2.0 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

While the finer details of new web standards like ActivityStrea.ms Realtime, PubSubHubbub and HTML5 Web Sockets are still being ironed out, the often-used, tried & true method of push messaging and real-time data integration in the Java community (not to mention larger developer community as a whole) has been Java Message Service (JMS).

JMS is a mainstay of the Java core and has been used for Web Service interoperability, as well as more innovative uses such as real-time and/or event-driven architecture (EDA) Web Applications.

In this article, I’d like to summarize some of my developments (i.e. joys and pains) with JMS in my current project, as well as summarize some best practices and lessons learned.
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BC$ = Behavior, Content, Money

The goal of the BC$ project is to raise awareness and make changes with respect to the three pillars of information freedom - Behavior (pursuit of interests and passions), Content (sharing/exchanging ideas in various formats), Money (fairness and accessibility) - bringing to light the fact that:

1. We regularly hand over our browser histories, search histories and daily online activities to companies that want our money, or, to benefit from our use of their services with lucrative ad deals or sales of personal information.

2. We create and/or consume interesting content on their services, but we aren't adequately rewarded for our creative efforts or loyalty.

3. We pay money to be connected online (and possibly also over mobile), yet we lose both time and money by allowing companies to market to us with unsolicited advertisements, irrelevant product offers and unfairly structured service pricing plans.

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