Behavior, Content, Money – 3 Things you should never give away for free!!!

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NB Hackathon – NoSQL, BigData and Linked Open Data for Government

Posted by bcmoney on February 28, 2015 in E-Government, NoSQL, Semantic Web, SQL, XML with No Comments


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This month, I participated in the NB Hackathon, an event that aims to bring developers in Atlantic Canada (particularly NB) together for the purpose of hacking on some interestling Linked Open Data and traditional (i.e. Microsoft Excel) Government Data sets which is being made publicly available for the first time.

The Internet of Things – If this then what?

Posted by bcmoney on January 10, 2015 in Cloud Computing, Mobile, Web Services with No Comments


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English: A technology roadmap of the Internet ...

English: A technology roadmap of the Internet of Things. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The “Internet of Things” (or IoT) is an evolution of microprocessor engineering, sensor innovations, wireless communications technologies, and of course the Internet itself. An IoT “thing” could be any natural or man-made object that can be assigned an IP address and provided with the ability to transfer data over a network. For example, inanimate objects (i.e. many cars have more built-in sensors than early NASA shuttles for doing everything from alerting the driver when tire pressure is low to regulating anti-lock breaking systems or airbag deployments during emergencies), animals (i.e. a wild animal tagged with biochip transponder to track position/population size or migration patterns) or people (i.e. an elderly person with a heart monitor device or any other implant tracking health data). In all of the previous examples, “things” are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human, human-to-animal, or human-to-computer interaction.

A major question of this Internet of Things is now what the “killer applications” will be. As in, what real-world problems will be solved, what efficiency improvements can be gained or which tangible benefits can be realized for the end user? By connecting more and more devices (thanks to the proliferation of IPv6 addresses, enough to give every atom on Earth’s surface a dedicated IP), we are of course creating more and more usage data,  observational data and metadata about the interactions of these devices and users within the rest of the world, which has also placed even more importance on BigData. Certainly, a big part of IoT will be task automation (the absence of a user during operation of devices and their software),  enabling devices to function more and more autonomously and theoretically freeing up users from manually entering commands via a command-line or clicking/tapping on controls within a user interface.

Enter the service If This Then That (IFTTT), which enables you to “wire together” the capabilities of or otherwise integrate data from two disparate sources to accomplish a particular goal.
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LayerPlayer released for SkipSearch

Posted by bcmoney on December 21, 2014 in AJAX, Cloud Computing, HTML, JavaScript, Semantic Web, TV with No Comments


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Announcing the availability of SkipSearch’s new Layer Player ALPHA version. This is still early days even though its a multi-year project for me, as I continue to work on this in my very rare spare time. This new feature will much more readily bring to light the capabilities of the recommendation engine built under the hood of SkipSearch (powered by OpenRecommender). With this release, SkipSearch is effectively moving from Alpha to Beta in 2015 and getting further and further from vaporware and inching slightly closer to being a legitimate full-blown, widely usable (and hopefully well-used) Web 3.0 application. Please take a moment to check it out, and sign up for the BETA if you haven’t already:

131818816_80_80

 

For comparison’s sake, here’s the architecture of a typical Web Crawler that powers most Search Engines:

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JS Podcatcher (a Podcast client written in JavaScript)

Posted by bcmoney on November 29, 2014 in HTML, JavaScript, Multimedia, TV with No Comments


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English: The "Made for iPod, iPhone, iPad...

English: The “Made for iPod, iPhone, iPad” emblem appearing on accessories approved by Apple Inc. for iPod, iPhone, and iPad. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

So just this month my 5-year old iPhone 3GS finally bit the dust. I had been hanging on and managed to make it through a major liquid submersion (thanks to the good folks at Atlantic Cell Phone Repair) several cracked screens (thanks to the good folks at iCracked). I’m pretty stubborn, and now that I’ve finished off my Mobile contract for it, pretty much at all costs I really didn’t want to have to buy another discounted device which usually requires one to agree to the terms of a foolishly one-sided/restrictive 2-year or 3-year contract; likewise, I really don’t want to shell out anywhere near the full asking price in the $500-$1000 price range for a new smartphone. So it’s either go back to my old Nokia flip-phone and live in the early 2000’s or hack my old 4th generation iPod Touch into something with phone call abilities. Of course, I opted for the latter!

Luckily thanks to an excellent VoIP app called BRIA (of which a 4th gen. iOS 4 version is still available in the iTunes App Store), I was able to continue using my Anveo VoIP service (please enter Referral Code 5334764 if registering) which I was already using through BRIA on the iPhone. I’ve already described Anveo in the post “My Experiment in Cutting Cords (and costs) with VoIP” where I went over setting the VoIP service up on an iPhone and just how much could actually be saved per month by taking the plunge and switching to VoIP. I’ve found that with a little patience (often using replacements, such as Slingplayer in place of Bell MobileTV, or, SoundHound in place of Shazam) along with some disappointment (can’t get an older versions of Netflix, UFC, Fitocracy, Skype, Instapaper, and several other key apps), I was able to get a good amount (about half) of the apps I was most frequently using on my iPhone, downloaded to the iPod in their older iOS 4-supported versions.

One somewhat irreplaceable one though that I just simply could not find, nor find a replacement for was the basic “Podcasts” app built by Apple (common alternatives RSSradio, Overcast, Downcast, TuneIN, Slacker, etc all did not work either on my device). I mean, seriously Apple, WTF!? Even the very first iPod devices were within a few years of their release to become known as a type of “Podcatcher”. The term “podcasting” was first mentioned by Ben Hammersley in The Guardian newspaper in a February 2004 article as a portmanteau of the words “pod”, from the success in consumerizing digital music with the iPod and “broadcast”. As such, the native “Podcasts” app has been around since the early days, as Podcatching (better known as receiving and listening to Podcasts), became one of the main functions of iPods just as it continues to be a core functionality on the many other iOS devices. Why then, are older (iOS < 6) versions of the Podcasts app not still available through the iTunes App Store? They existed then, and now they’re just plain unavailable it seems. What if a legacy iPod user (anyone still on iOS 4 or lower for that matter) accidentally wipes or restores their device to factory settings? Tough luck if they didn’t store a backup that had the app. This is an example of planned obsolescence at its worst!!!

Could the Podcast app’s functionality be replaced with a quickly hacked together web app though? That’s the question I wanted an answer to. So I realized it definitely should be doable, as Podcasts to me have always simply been RSS news feeds with links to Audio files embedded in them in a variety of ways (and thanks to Apple’s aforementioned “Podcatching” dominance, also garnished with plenty of Apple-specific iTunes namespace syntactic metadata to appeal to the behemoth that is the iTunes Store and rank better therein).

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Musa Betsu Kyu Judo club website launch

Posted by bryan on September 1, 2014 in E-Learning, HTML, Philanthropy with No Comments


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Japanese judoka ,Jigoro Kano(right) and Kyuzo ...

Japanese judoka ,Jigoro Kano(right) and Kyuzo Mifune(left) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Just a quick update on what I’ve been up to lately in my spare time (well one of the many projects), working on the site for the local (Greater Moncton area) Judo club called “Musa Betsu Kyu”. It is run by Sensei Earl O’Blenis who is an excellent Judo instructor that we’re fortunate to have in the area. If you have a moment please signup for the site and/or Facebook Group and support the club.

The highlights of the site so far are the ability to pay for your monthly club dues online with a single click (for the forgetful you can either set it up as a monthly subscription or one-time payment), as well as two interactive charts; the first being the “Gokyo Tachi Waza” (Judo’s 5 levels of standing techniques) and “Ne Waza” (Judo’s ground grappling/wrestling).

Check out the new website/blog at:

monctonjudo.com

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BC$ = Behavior, Content, Money

The goal of the BC$ project is to raise awareness and make changes with respect to the three pillars of information freedom - Behavior (pursuit of interests and passions), Content (sharing/exchanging ideas in various formats), Money (fairness and accessibility) - bringing to light the fact that:

1. We regularly hand over our browser histories, search histories and daily online activities to companies that want our money, or, to benefit from our use of their services with lucrative ad deals or sales of personal information.

2. We create and/or consume interesting content on their services, but we aren't adequately rewarded for our creative efforts or loyalty.

3. We pay money to be connected online (and possibly also over mobile), yet we lose both time and money by allowing companies to market to us with unsolicited advertisements, irrelevant product offers and unfairly structured service pricing plans.

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